Which Anchor Nest is right for my boat?

13 September, 2016 4 comments Leave a comment

I often get asked, "Which anchor nest is right for my boat?"

One of the first things I ask is, what size of boat do you have and how big is the bow plate or bow deck? In other words, how much space do you have to mount your anchor nest on?

For the most part, you can more than likely fit all the Anchor Caddie models on your boat, since you only need a minimum of 9" mounting surface for the PRO and Original models and only 5 1/2" for the Cadet. for complete specifications, click here.

As you can see, when you are trying to figure out and ask, which anchor nest is right for my boat, you have options and below we will give you some bullet points to consider in finding the right anchor nest for your boat.

Anchor Caddie Original

  • 1/8” Powder Coated Stainless Steel
  • UV Resistant Rollers, Guards and Trim
  • 3”, 5 piece Independent Roller System
  • Locking Pin to Secure Anchor
  • 18” Overall Length, 3 ½” Wide

Anchor Caddie PRO

  • 1/4” Powder Coated Marine Grade Aluminum
  • UV Resistant Rollers, Guards and Trim
  • 4”, 5 piece Independent Roller System
  • Locking Pin to Secure Anchor
  • 18” Overall Length, 4 ½” Wide
  • Built In Pivoting Cleat
  • Rotating Posts for Multiple Anchor Sizes

Anchor Caddie Cadet

Anchor Caddie Cadet anchor roller

  • 1/8” Powder Coated Stainless Steel
  • UV Resistant Rollers, Guards and Trim
  • 3”, 3 piece Independent Roller System
  • Locking Pin to Secure Anchor
  • 11” Overall Length, 3 ½” Wide

Anchor Caddie Cadet MAX

  • 1/8” Powder Coated Stainless Steel
  • UV Resistant Rollers, Guards and Trim
  • 3”, 5 piece Independent Roller System
  • Locking Pin to Secure Anchor
  • 11” Overall Length, 3 ½” Wide

If you are considering our smaller version, the Cadet or the Cadet Max, which is more suited for smaller boats with a smaller bow plate, you want to make sure that if you have a bigger bow plate, that the post of the anchor doesn't sit on your bow. if this occurs, you may not be able to use the pin function to secure your anchor unless you elevate the Cadet.

      Anchor Caddie Anchor Bow Roller Anchor Caddie Anchor Nest, Anchor Locker, Anchor Bracket   

 

Well, I hope this helped you determine which anchor nest is right for your boat.

If your questions were not answered here, don't hesitate to contact us!

 

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Comments

  1. Anchor Caddie July 02, 2018

    Hi Dave,

    Sorry about not getting to your comment in a timely manner!

    If you have not found an answer to your question:

    Our 25lb anchor can hold you in certain areas on the Columbia river and if you opted for that, I would recommend that you add 6 – 15 foot of chain to help out the situation.

    As far as our anchor being able to come up into your anchor nest with the electric lift, it is not designed to do that, but is possible. Most folks around here on the river are using a buy ball/puller system, as opposed to an electric method.

    You can see what I’m talking by watching our video on the main Anchor Caddie page about half way down.

    Let me know if you have any more questions.

    Regards,

    Paul Anderson

  2. Dave July 02, 2018

    Looking for an anchor that will hold my 25’ Wellcraft, I have an electric lift system that works very well but the Danforth type anchor does not hold in the Columbia, will your anchor work for a much heavier boat. Just learning to fish and don’t want to get a different boat.

  3. Anchor Caddie June 29, 2017

    Hi PN,

    The short answer, yes! The Cadet is made of the same material as the Original, 1/8" thick stainless steel. I now use our Anchor Caddie PRO, but for almost 10 years, I only pulled from the anchor nest.

    If you have the anchor nest mounted solidly on your bow, you shouldn’t have any problem at all.

    Good luck and let us know if you have any more questions.

    Paul,
    Anchor Caddie Team

  4. PN June 29, 2017

    I am considering the cadet model. I would like to know when raising a large anchor (38#) in the Columbia River using a buoy lift in depths up to 100 feet if it’s advisable to keep the rope in the bow roller or remove it from the nest and secure it to a cleat near the bow. Just wondering if the nest is capable of that much force on it. Thank you.

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