What type and size of rope do I need for my boat’s anchor system?

18 September, 2017 0 comments Leave a comment

What type and size anchor rope for a boat's anchor system

If you are wondering, “What type and size of rope do I need for my boat’s anchor system?”

When choosing your rope size and type for your anchor system, there are a couple of things you should consider and we will discuss them here. But remember, these are just guidelines, not set in stone rules.

Some reputable sources say a good rule of thumb is 1/8” rope for every 9’ of boat.

Anchor Rope Sizing Rule of Thumb

That being the case, then an 18’ boat would need ¼” rope and that may very well be sufficient, but it just seems a bit too small for my liking.

Now, jump up to a 19’ boat and that would make it 3/8” rope. Now that is starting to make more sense to me and that is what I use for my 19’ boat.

You don’t hit the ½” need until you get to about a 35 – 40’ boat, unless it is a very heavy craft.

All that being said, I think that 3/8” rope is the sweet spot for most boats up to about 30’ and I would even use 3/8” as a minimum, no matter how small the boat is.

So, in determining what size of rope you need for your boat’s anchor system, I hope that sheds some light on the subject.

Now, let’s discuss the rope type that you would use for anchoring.

First off, you will NOT want a rope that floats. Ropes that float, like polypropylene, can create a hazard if you must cut your line because your anchor gets stuck or you throw your line overboard to chase a fish.

Polypropylene Rope for anchoring a boatFloating rope for anchoring a boat

If left floating, you or some other boater can run over the floating line and get caught in the prop or impeller and can be dangerous.

Nylon rope is the accepted norm for anchor line, not only does is sink, it is relatively inexpensive and elastic as well, so when a wave hits, it will stretch and absorb some of the shock, then go back into shape.

3 strand nylon is a good choice for cost reasons, but solid braid is more flexible and doesn’t cost that much more, so personally, I don’t scrimp on that.

The only downside to solid braid compared to 3 strand is, 3 strand is easier to splice than solid braid, but good knots on solid braid are more than effective, so I choose solid braid.

Well, I hope that was informative and gave you some good information on what type and size of rope you need for your boat’s anchor system.

Don’t hesitate to leave a comment below if you have any questions or other input you have on the subject.

For more information on the right anchoring equipment for your boat, visit your local outfitter or go to anchor-caddie.com today and thanks for listening!

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